Monthly Archives: October 2012

From ENGAGE: How Question Create “Movement”

A masterful facilitator appears to guide the group effortlessly toward the desired insight or outcome. He or she creates movement in the group by asking the questions that guide the thinking of the group. In ENGAGE, the first part of the 4MAT cycle, the training method used is dialogue. Questions are the primary tool used to guide learners through this part of the learning cycle.

The way the facilitator phrases or “frames” a question will determine the possible set of answers that might emerge from that question. For example, the closed-ended question, “Do you like the color blue?” opens up two possibilities: yes or no. The open-ended question, “What is your favorite shade of blue?” opens up many possible answers, including sky blue, baby blue, neon blue, cobalt blue, etc.

Source: Engage, The Trainer’s Guide to Learning Styles (Wiley 2012)

4MAT Learning Styles Descriptions

Your 4MAT learning style preference refers to your preference for how you like to take in and make meaning of new information. The combination of different learning approaches shapes the behaviors of learners:

Learning Style Type One 4MAT Learning Style Type One
Prefer to take in information from a “feeling” perspective and make sense of it by “watching.” In a new learning situation, Type One learners will rely on their intuition and gut when deciding on the relevance of new information. They will take time to think things through before acting.
Learning Style Type Two 4MAT Learning Style Type Two
Prefer to take in information from a “thinking” perspective and make sense of it by “watching.” In a new learning situation, Type Two learners will rely on external data and knowledge when deciding on the relevance of information. They will make sense of new information by reflecting and thinking things through before trying out new approaches.
Learning Style Type Three 4MAT Learning Style Type Three
Prefer to take in information from a “thinking” perspective and make sense of it by “doing.” In a new learning situation, Type Three learners will rely on practicality as a guide to determining relevance. They will figure things out by playing around with new information and experimenting
Learning Style Type Four 4MAT Learning Style Type Four
Prefer to take in information from a “feeling” perspective and make sense of it by “doing.” In a new learning situation, Type Four learners will rely on intuition and own sense of what will work. They will try different approaches to determine the usefulness of the information being learned.
You can assess your learning style preferences by completing the Learning Type Measure.

Cool People Doing Great Things with 4MAT: Daisy Asiimwe Byarugaba of Compassion International

Daisy Asiimwe Byarugaba, EAA Learning and Support Specialist, Program Communications at Compassion International, partnered with Dennis Mugimba (whom we met last month) in applying 4MAT during our recent 4MAT Instructional Design Fundamentals online course.

What are you working on? How are you using 4MAT in this work?
I worked on a team assignment with Dennis Mugimba (one of my colleagues) in using 4MAT to design a training on HPI and performance management. The 4MAT training was timely because we were able to use this approach in instructional design that married a number of concepts that we would ordinarily have handled separately. I have also been working with our global learning team to design sessions for a tours management summit which is beginning today in Colorado Springs.

What have you discovered lately that has positively impacted the results you are creating through the learning experiences you design?
Oh my goodness, so many things!  Given that I had only been a learning professional for a year at the time I begun the training, one of the most important things for me was is the importance of being systematic in designing a learning experience that is impactful. Although I knew intuitively the importance of having the learner in mind and have always designed my sharings (again intuitively) on the 4 quadrants, I had never fully realized that one can actually address all four aspects in a training.

The other was that one must always follow the cycle while delivering learning, but not when designing the sessions (that was quite the eye opener). I also learned the importance of not delivering learning for its own sake (information transfer) but for visible and measurable transformation – hence the critical importance of evaluation of learning.

What’s your favorite quote? Why?
My all time favorite quote is “If men could only know each other, they would neither idolize nor hate.” ~Elbert Hubbard.

I love this quote because it reminds me that people are people wherever we go – it doesn’t matter what the race, size, creed or stature is. We often admire or hate people from a stand point of ignorance/not having a full picture of who they really are and it is only when we see people as people … that we are able to fully appreciate and work with/impact them appropriately. It also reminds me that in the school of life, anyone can be my teacher, not just the people I like and admire.