Tag Archives: 4mat course

Technique + Power + Speed = 4MAT Cycle

Where do most of us get stuck on our way to building mastery in a new skill?

Our 4MAT course creators often ask, “How do we help learners get unstuck?” We can get stuck on technique when the new thing we are trying doesn’t create the impact (power) we want or the results don’t show up quickly enough (speed).

If you use a new approach for coaching a client (technique) and it feels awkward (power) and you see no immediate change in the results of the person you are coaching (speed), it is tempting to abandon that technique and either go back to your old approach or shop around for a new one.

How can we focus on building technique + power + speed?

  • Put the new technique into practice.
  • Debrief your application. What worked? What could have been better?
  • Bring your insights into your next round of practice.
  • Repeat.

The key is to continue noticing what worked and what you could do better. The very act of focusing attention on amplifying the results you are getting in each round of practice will create power. As you continue wiring the new behavior through practice, you will gain speed.

Invitation for comment: How can you address this in the 4MAT courses you design for others?

Here’s what to focus on instead of your goal

Here’s why most New Year’s resolutions aren’t realized: focusing on a goal doesn’t work.

The key focus of every 4MAT course design is to deliver results. If you want to create a result, the fastest way to do that is to mirror the beliefs and behaviors of someone already achieving the result. The high performer that is already achieving what you want to achieve is not focused on the goal. They are focused on the beliefs and behaviors that enable them to do what they need to do to deliver the result consistently.

Let’s explore the beliefs and behaviors that influence the #1 most commonly made (and broken) New Year’s resolution: to lose weight and get fit.

What do fit people of a healthy weight do to achieve this goal?

Example behavior: Exercise 3-5x a week for one hour.

What do they believe that enables them to do this consistently?

Example belief: “To exercise 5x a week, I just need to plan in advance and schedule exercise into my day.”

To create any result, you can work backwards from the goal by asking these 4 questions:

  1. What result do I want to achieve?
    Example: Write a book.
  2. Who is already achieving it?
    Example: “My mentor, Sue, wrote 3 books in the last 5 years.”
  3. What do they do that enables them to achieve this result?
    Example: She sets a minimum requirement to write 2 pages a day, 5 days a week, before she does anything else.
  4. What do they believe that enables them to be consistent with this behavior?
    Example: Sue believes that the discipline of making time to write daily is what enables her to be creative.

So, here’s what to focus on instead of your health, relationship, business, team or life goal:

What’s the one thing you need to do consistently to achieve it?

What belief will get you there?