Tag Archives: training activities

4MAT Train the Trainer: 6 Activities for the Perform Step

In the 4MAT model for training design, there are four parts of the learning cycle that the trainer leads the learner through. In the fourth part of the cycle, Perform, the trainer is focused on building the assessment and adaptation skills of the learner.  Let’s take a look at what is happening in this step:

4MAT model: perform

Source:  McCarthy and O’Neill-Blackwell, Hold On, You Lost Me! Use Learning Styles to Create Training that Sticks, ASTD Press, p 25.

In Perform, the trainer invites the learner to assess the practice application which occurred in the previous step, Practice. The learner is assessing and adjusting and the trainer is guiding this process. Activities that encourage the learner to assess, refine and adapt the content being learned are appropriate for this part of the training design.

Here are some examples of activities that fit well in Practice:

1. 10-10-10
Objective: Planning activity focused on implementation of the learning in the next 10 days, 10 weeks and 10 months.

2. “Co”+ “Labor”=Collaboration
Objective: Learners will devise an action plan for implementation of learning. This activity focuses on personal and team accountability around the learning.

3. Exit Interview
Objective: As a final “exam”, participants will interview each other in a reflective manner about the learning that has occurred.

4. Super Hero
Objective: Using a Super Hero as a metaphor, participants will reflect on tools and skills needed to implement the knowledge.

5. Reunion Web Call
Objective: Learners participate in a post-session call to review implementation or learning commitments.

6. Elearning: Branched Scenario Simulations
Objective: Learners assess the effectiveness of alternative applications of the content being learned.

Download the facilitator guide with complete instructions:

4MAT Train the Trainer: 3 Activities for Practice

In the 4MAT model for training design, there are four parts of the learning cycle that the trainer leads the learner through. In the third part, Practice, the trainer is focused on building learner skills that directly link to the desired business impact of the training course.  Let’s take a look at what is happening in this step:

4MAT model: practice

Source: McCarthy and O’Neill-Blackwell, Hold On, You Lost Me! Use Learning Styles to Create Training that Sticks, ASTD Press, p 25.

In Practice, the trainer invites the learner to move into application of the information presented in Share. The learner is doing and the trainer is observing and coaching. Activities that encourage the learner to apply, adapt, practice and/or problem-solve work in this part of the learning cycle.

Here are some examples of activities that fit well in Practice:

  1. Craft a Story vs Report a Story
    Objective: Reprocessing activity which requires learners to develop a story around the information being shared. Learners are divided into two reporting groups: creative story-telling and “just the facts” reporting.
  2. At Your Finger Tips Resource Guide
    Objective: Participants will build a personal, reference guide of the content using index cards and a ring binder.
  3. The Law of Three
    Objective: Action planning activity which encourages learners to identify 3 key learning focuses and plan specific actions around these ideas.

Download the facilitator guide with complete instructions:

Expectations Activity

Two Harvard University researchers, Rosenthal and Jacobsen gave an intelligence test to all of the students at an elementary school at the beginning of the year. They then randomly chose 20% of the students and assigned them to a select group of teachers. The teachers were told that the students they were assigned for the year showed “unusual potential for intellectual growth” and they could expect to see the children “bloom” over the year. At the end of the school year, the researchers came back and re-tested the children. Those children labeled as “intelligent” showed significantly greater increase in testing over the other children in the school. The change in the teachers’ expectations of the children led to a concrete change in the children’s test results.

Expectations are a powerful force in life. Think about any instance when you have been unhappy and I bet you can link the unhappiness to an expectation that was not met. The truth is, what we believe to be and what we believe will be has a great impact on what actually is.  Tap into the learners’ expectations, meet them and you have a dynamic learning experience. The only way to do this is to create dialogue, be flexible and trust your ability to go where the learning conversation needs to go.

How to do this?

1-Do a reality check on your expectations. Are you expecting a certain reaction to the content? Are you expecting a certain level of interest or disinterest from the learner? Are you expecting that “this group” won’t do “this activity”?  Be careful that your expectations are shaped by reality–observations of what learners need, concrete data and real listening give us a good picture of expectations and a map to meeting them.

2-Start with an expectations exercise. At the beginning of a course,  ask the learners to reflect on and answer the question, “It is the end of this session and you leave thinking to yourself, “This was a good investment of my time.” What expectations would be met for you to feel this was a meaningful investment of time?”

After individually answering, have table groups combine their thoughts into themes. Mindmap all the responses shared from the table groups. You can now connect the agenda to the expectations, adjust as needed and handle any gaps up front.

In a first-time manager course we developed for a client, we simply created a page in the course workbook that describes the Oak School experiment.  For the 4mat-savvy, this was our Attend (1L) activity. We then asked the participants to answer two questions individually and in group:

What is the relationship between expectations and performance?

How does this relationship impact your role in leading your team to higher performance?

Invite dialogue around expectations. Lead the learner to a shared expectation of the course outcomes. You will create more happiness in the world.